Tip of the Week – Week 4 in the Zone 9 Garden

We got over an inch of rain at my house last night.  We are expected to get another inch today.  I am thankful but I hope the sun comes out tomorrow.  If it is not too muddy there are tons of tasks to take care of this weekend.  Here are some of the things I am doing:

Vegetables

Week 4 in the Zone 9 garden is a very busy time.  It is time to replant all of your brassicas.  The brassica family includes broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and others.  Click on each veggie above to read Patty Leander’s tips for growing the best brassicas possible.

Patty also wrote a great post about sugar snap peas.  It is time to plant those as well.  This year she has had great luck with “Amish” heirlooms.  Get all the info you need to succeed with peas by reading her post  “Make Room for Cool Season Peas”.

Week four is also the time to plant potatoes.  The two varieties that do best for me are Red LaSoda and white Kennebecks.  Buy now, cut into pieces preserving the eyes and allow to cure for a week or so before planting.  Check out my post “Growing Potatoes” to learn all the other tips and tricks you need.

Cauliflower doesn't have to be white!  Try some of the colored varieties.  Photo by Bruce Leander

Cauliflower doesn’t have to be white! Try some of the colored varieties. Photo by Bruce Leander

Ornamentals

Patty’s latest post reminded me that it is time to cut back your cannas (and ginger).  Cut them to the ground.  Here’s another canna tip.  When they start blooming, cut their flower stalks out at the base of the plant.  This will encourage them to bloom more.

It is also a good time to trim up woody perennials.  My bougainvillea has shed its leaves so it is ready for its annual haircut.  Trim up other deciduous vines like coral honeysuckle, cross vine and wisteria.

If you want lots of flowers in early spring, start their seeds now.  Two years ago I grew 100 marigold transplants.  My beds never looked better.  This weekend is a good time to start marigolds, petunias, begonias, periwinkles and many others.

marigolds

Fruit

It is still a good time to plant bare root fruit trees.  It is also a great time to plant container grown fruit trees.  Container grown fruit trees can be planted anytime of the year but they will root in and become established quicker if you plant them now.

****Be sure to check out my friend Bart’s blog (Our Garden View) for more great tips for the Central and South Central garden!

This post has been shared on the HomeAcre Hop.  Be sure to stop by the hop.  Tons of great information from gardeners and homesteaders all over the world!

Brassicas Rule, Cannas Drool by Patty G. Leander

Cannas may be beautiful in the summer time, but they sure aren’t very pretty after a freeze. Mine bit the dust right around Christmas, when Old Man Winter showed up and decided to stick around for awhile. Of course my small bed of canna lilies dies back every year yet every year I am amazed at the contrast of the gloomy canna skeletons against the vibrant greens, purples and reds of the brassicas that shrug off the cold weather and keep on growing, proving once again that they deserve a prime spot in the winter garden.

cannas-freeze-damage

Canna lilies would prefer to spend their winter on a tropical island (me too!) but they’ll be back this summer. Photo by Bruce Leander

Seasoned gardeners are well aware of these gems of the winter garden, but for novice gardeners and those who have been on the fence about a winter garden, I’d like to share a few easy-to-grow vegetables to consider planting next fall.

Chinese-Cabbage

Mustards, kale and Chinese cabbages love the cold weather. Photo by Bruce Leander

I usually plant sugar snap peas twice a year, mid-September and late January. This year I planted a vining variety from Seed Savers Exchange, called ‘Amish Snap’, on September 17. I started picking on November 11 and plants were still producing in December even after several light freezes. On January 8th we experienced a freeze with temperatures that fell into the low 20s; the plants survived but the peas took a hit (Note: a more diligent gardener would have harvested the pods before the arrival of a predicted hard freeze!). The outer pods were damaged but many of the peas inside were perfectly edible, with a flavor slightly reminiscent of, well, frozen peas. Since the vines are healthy and the weather is mild, I’ll leave the vines for now to see if I’ll get a another flush of blooms and pods, but in the meantime I’ll seed another round of peas for a spring harvest.

Amish-Snap-Peas

‘Amish Snap’ peas: planting seeds in September, ready to harvest in November, freeze damage in January. Photo by Bruce Leander

Swiss chard, beets and spinach do not belong to the brassica family but they are ideal specimens for a winter garden.

beets-in-hand

Beets that were seeded in September have provided roots and lovely greens all winter long. Photo by Bruce Leander

Other stalwarts for the winter garden include onions, spinach, carrots and almost every herb you can imagine, except basil. We still have cold winter days ahead and any of these vegetable or herbs could be planted this month to bridge the gap between winter and spring.

multiplying-onions

Multiplying onions look grow so well in the winter garden, and they look great too! Photo by Bruce Leander

winter-mint

Brighten up your winter meals with the fresh flavor of multiplier onions, mint, dill and oregano.

Tip of the Week – Week 3 in the Zone 9 Garden

There are two things that really need to be done in January in the lower two thirds of our state–starting tomato, pepper and egg plant seeds for transplant and planting asparagus.  It is also time to start pruning fruit trees, grapes and perennial ornamentals that have been killed by the freeze.

Vegetables

I don’t want to sound like a nag, but this week is THE PERFECT TIME to plant your tomato seeds.  You can also start your pepper and eggplant seeds too.  Eggplant will germinate much like the tomato seeds but be prepared to give you pepper seeds a little extra time to sprout.

Besides tomatoes, asparagus is my absolute favorite vegetable to grow and eat.  Plant year old crowns now.  My favorite is the heirloom “Mary Washington”.  However, I have had much luck with many varieties of the “Jersey” series.  For more information on planting asparagus check out my post “Growing Asparagus”.

planting-asparagus-crowns

When planting, spread the roots of asparagus crowns over a mound of compost

Ornamentals

Now that we have had a freeze, it is time to trim back some of our perennials.  Clumping grasses can be cut back to about ten inches.  If your grass clumps did not bloom this year consider dividing them in February.  Salvias can be cut back to half of their size.  Root Beer plant (Hoja Santo) can be cut to the ground.

ornamental-grass

Cut clumping grasses back to 10 to 12 inches

Fruit

January and February are the best times to plant bare root fruit trees.  Plant them at the depth they were grown.  Determine this depth by noticing where the color changes at the top of the roots and the bottom of the trunk.

January is also a good time to prune fruit trees and grapes in the lower two thirds of our state.

****Be sure to check out my friend Bart’s blog (Our Garden View) for more great tips for the Central and South Central garden!

This post has been shared on the HomeAcre Hop.  Be sure to stop by the hop.  Tons of great information from gardeners and homesteaders all over the world!

peach-blossom

January is good time to prune fruit trees. Definitely do a little research before you start cutting.

Tip of the Week – Week 2 in the Zone 9 Garden

If it is not raining or freezing this weekend there are lots of things to be done in the Zone 9 garden.

Ornamentals

It is not too late to plant pansies, Johnny Jump Ups (viola), cyclamen, snap dragons, alyssum and ornamental cabbage.  Water in new transplants with fish emulsion or other water soluble organic  fertilizers.  Fertilize established plants with 6 cups of organic fertilizer (or two cups of synthetic) per 25 sqaure feet of plantings.

pansy-1

It is still not too late to set out pansies and violas.

Vegetables

If you have not already planted onions, do so this month.  Discard any onions that have a diameter bigger than a pencil.  Onions are heavy feeders with a small root system.  Because of this you need to keep the onion bed weed free and fertilize monthly at a rate of 6 cups of organic fertilizer (or two cups of synthetic) per 25 sqaure feet of plantings.  For detailed information on growing onions in Zone 9 check out my post “Grow Bigger, Sweeter Onions”.

January is the month to start your tomato transplants from seed.  If you want big, healthy plants by March 15 you need to get the seeds planted by January 15.  MOH contributor Patty Leander has a great article about this in this month’s Texas Gardener Magazine.  You can also see how long time Austin reader Harry Cabluck grows his transplants in my post “Harry Cabluck’s Tips for Growing Healthy Tomato Transplants”.

Tomato transplants (and photos) by Austin reader Harry CabluckMaintenance

If you still have leaves on the ground, rake them up before they blow away.  Leaves are great mulch and great compost additives.  Now is also a good time to get out your row cover (or buy new).  If you have things planted now you are probably going to need it in the next few weeks.

****Be sure to check out my friend Bart’s blog (Our Garden View) for more great tips for the Central and South Central garden!

This post has been shared on the HomeAcre Hop.  Be sure to check out all the great tips and tricks on this outstanding gathering of bloggers.

New Feature for the New Year

Happy New Year! 2014 was the best year ever for the blog.  I am truly grateful that you chose to get some of your garden tips from The Masters of Horticulture!

Photo by Bruce Leander

Photo by Bruce Leander

Each year I look for ways to make the blog more useful to all of my fellow organic gardeners.  This year I am going to do a weekly “Tip of the Week” feature on the blog.  This idea came to me when a Texas Gardener reader contacted me about doing a weekly radio segment that would let Houston area gardeners know what they needed to be doing in their gardens each week of the year. I thought this was a great idea. However, since horticulture is just a hobby for me, I referred the reader to one of the best organic gardeners in the state. Bart Brechter is the Curator of Gardens for the Museum of Fine Arts Houston. He runs the incredibly beautiful gardens at Bayou Bend and he does it organically.  He also hosts the “Our Garden View” blog.

Bart did a couple of episodes and then the radio changed formats and dropped the segment. While we were both disappointed, we really thought the radio station was on to something. We both feel that a weekly tip list is a great tool for all gardeners. So, we have decided to work together to provide these weekly tips to our readers. Starting this week, he and I will begin posting weekly tips that will let you know what you can or should be doing in the garden that weekend. Be sure to check out the tips on both blogs. Bart and I are different types of gardeners.  By reading both sets of tips you will get a good variety of ideas to try in your own Central Texas Gardens.

Photo by Bruce Leander

Photo by Bruce Leander

Winter Garden Chores

There is always something to do in the Texas garden – even in the winter.  Granted, winter does kind of reduce the number of tasks, but our mild winter ensures that we can be outside tending or growing something every single month of the year.  While there are several tasks in winter that can help us get our gardening fix, winter gardening does have its challenges.  It seems like every time I need to weed or plant or harvest it is either raining or miserably cold.  Sunday was a perfect example of this.  Despite the cold and the standing water in my rows, nature had decided to provide me with a bountiful brassica harvest; as long as I was man enough to brave the elements and harvest it.

The broccoli I harvested this weekend was planted on Sept. 28.  It will continue to produce for me until April or May.  Photo by Bruce Leander.

The broccoli I harvested this weekend was planted on Sept. 28. It will continue to produce for me until April or May. Photo by Bruce Leander.

I am proud to say, I sucked it up and was richly rewarded for my efforts.  Once I got in the garden and started cutting my cole crops I didn’t even notice the cold.  Before long I had harvested six pounds of broccoli, some gumbo onions, a bunch of baby carrots and a three pound head of cauliflower.  I don’t know about you but nothing gets my garden juices flowing more than a good harvest.  As I worked I actually forgot about the cold and enjoyed myself in my muddy little garden.  When I brought the veggies in  I was reminded again why I love gardening in Texas.  I really can enjoy healthy, organic produce year round.

While I was in the garden I also noticed lots of broad leaf weeds that were doing about as well as the broccoli.  So, while I was out I took the hoe to them.  Hoeing is not nearly as much work on a 40 degree day. Because it was such a “pleasant afternoon” I actually enjoyed chopping through all of the dandelions and thistles that were popping up.

This weekend I harvested my first cauliflower of the season - a three pounder!  Photo by Bruce Leander

This weekend I harvested my first cauliflower of the season – a three pounder! Photo by Bruce Leander

Luckily, not all winter gardening chores have to be done outside.  It is currently time to do what I consider the most important gardening task of the entire year —STARTING YOUR TOMATO TRANSPLANTS!!!  If you live in zone 9 you need to get your seeds started by January 15 to ensure you have big, healthy transplants on March 15.  My friend, and MOH contributor, Patty Leander has a great article in this month’s Texas Gardener magazine on growing your own tomatoes from seed.  If you don’t subscribe I really recommend picking up this issue.  Her article is awesome.

It is time to start those tomato seeds!  There is no other way to ensure you have the varieties you want when planting time comes.  Photo by Bruce Leander

It is time to start those tomato seeds! There is no other way to ensure you have the varieties you want when planting time comes. Photo by Bruce Leander

Growing Paperwhites

This weekend Sally and I did a little Christmas shopping.  This is not a part of the holiday season that I enjoy.  To be perfectly honest, I hate it.  So as “we” were shopping I wandered around looking for diversions.  After a couple of stores I found it; paperwhites!  I was truly amazed at how many stores had paperwhites for sale.  I did a little count and discovered that all but one (a sporting goods store) of the shops we went in had little boxes of paperwhite bulbs for sale.  I guess this shouldn’t have surprised me.  Each Christmas season Sally and I grow (and give away) a whole lot of paperwhite narcissus bulbs.  I guess we are not the only ones.  And why not?  Paperwhites are cheap, easy to grow, smell great (in my opinion) and make the house look great for months.  They really are the perfect gift for anyone that has even the most remote interest in horticulture.

This year I am growing my paperwhites in a lovely fluted bowl.  I cover the soil with sphagnum moss.

This year I am growing my paperwhites in a lovely fluted bowl. I cover the soil with sphagnum moss.

Paperwhites are a type of narcissus that originated, and are still produced in, the areas around the Mediterranean.  There are many different bulbs that are generically called paperwhites.  While the paperwhites you and I grow may be different species or varieties they all have one thing in common – they are a type of narcissus that does not require chilling.  Most of the flowers in the Narcissus genus ( narcissus, daffodils, and jonquils) require some period of cold weather before they flower,  Not paperwhites.  This trait allows them to be shipped all over the world and be forced into bloom for several of our cooler months.

Growing Paperwhites in Soil

In my opinion, forcing paperwhites in soil is the easiest and most reliable way to produce a large fragrant clump of white flowers.  You don’t need a lot of soil to successfully grow your paperwhites. Because of this you can plant paperwhites in a lot of things you might not normally use as a planter.  While I am currently using a large fluted serving bowl I have used gravy boats and a sterling silver fish server in the past. Regardless of the container you use , you want to use a high quality and well draining potting mix,  Fill your container part of the way and add your bulbs.  Once the bulbs are arranged add enough soil to just cover the bulbs.  Once your bulbs are planted soak the soil and drain it well (if the container does not have a drain hole water the soil before placing it in the container).  Place the bulbs in a cool place (55 to 65 degrees) for a week to ten days.  Once the leaves begin to show, move your paperwhites to a warm (70 to 75) area of the house that gets plenty of sunlight.  Keep your soil moist and in about three weeks your first buds will begin to form.   Once the buds open move your flowers out of direct sunlight to extend their life.

paperwhites-1

I love the white gravel and cranberries!

Growing Paperwhites in Pebbles

Paperwhite bulbs are almost as pretty as the flowers they produce.  You can highlight the attractive bulbs by growing them in dishes filled with gravel or pebbles.  I love this method and I have seen some creative people create very attractive displays in containers ranging from teacups to vintage coffee tins.  If growing your bulbs in this manner simply place enough gravel or pebbles around the bulbs to support them.  Then fill your container with just enough water to come in contact with the bottom of the bulbs.  Keep the water at this level throughout the plants life and follow the steps mentioned above to extend their bloom.

paperwhites-bulbs-1

I think paperwhite bulbs are almost as pretty as their blooms

Droopy Foliage

About the only drawback these flowers have is their tendency to produce droopy leaves.  While this doesn’t hurt the plant, it can make your arrangement look a little messy.  These droopy leaves are partially caused when your plants do not get enough direct sunlight.  If you have a bright, sunny spot try and grow them there and rotate them every few days.  If not there are many cute and decorative ways to control the droop.  One of the easiest is to glue an attractive ribbon midway up the foliage.  There are also several ways to “stake” your foliage.  Check out this cute “stake” that my friend C.L. Fornari at “Coffee for Roses” made from native vines that grow around her yard.

vine_supoort_paperwhites_growing

Lovely homemade support made from wild vines. Great and decorative way to support your foliage from C. L. Fornari at the “Coffee for Roses” blog. Check it out at the link above.

Growing Paperwhites Outside

If you live in the south, you don’t have to throw your bulbs away after the blooms fade.  Paperwhites do great outdoors and they will be the first winter bulbs to bloom in your beds.  Simply plant them about one bulb’s length deep in full sun and well-draining soil.  Because of their Mediterranean heritage they do well here on normal rainfall so you can plant them in places that are hard to reach with the hose.  Since they bloom so early (November) there is a good chance that an early freeze will nip their buds before they flower.  No worries.  While you may not get flowers every year you will get a lovely clump of green foliage in your bed that will do the photosynthesis needed to replenish the bulb for next year’s bloom.

This post has been shared on The Homeacre Hop.  This week’s hop has a ton of great holiday ideas.  Check it out!

paperwhite-outdoors

Paperwhites growing around the perimeter of an abandoned homesite on a friends property.

PERENNIAL GARDEN BULBS FOR CENTRAL TEXAS by Cynthia W. Mueller

Today’s post comes from my friend Cynthia Mueller.  Cynthia and I became friends while I was working on my masters degree at A&M.  She is a volunteer in the horticultural extension department and one of the most knowledgeable plant people I have ever known.  She is also the first person to ever publish any of my garden writings.  Cynthia is an expert on so many things.  However she has a special love for bulbs.  Cynthia recently spoke to a local garden club and she sent me her talk.  It is the most comprehensive list of the best bulbs for our part of Texas that I have ever seen.  While you are sitting inside this winter dreaming of your spring garden, why not peruse her list of the best bulbs for our central Texas gardens.  These bulbs are perennial in our area and will brighten your garden for years.

Amaryllis Johnsonii or Hardy Red Amaryllis.  This was one of the first amaryllis to be hybridized in England, around 1812.  It is more cold tolerant than Dutch or florists’ amaryllis, or hippeastrums.  But in our climate gift bulbs of florists’ amaryllis can be recycled into the garden where they will live except after the coldest of winters.  These are classic hand-me-down Southern bulbs, good in climates to about 7b.

crinum-bulbispermum-1

Lovely bulbispermum crinum in my front bed

Crinums are truly indicative of Southern gardens.  They are found in many different forms.  Everyone has heard of “milk and wine lilies” but these are not just one plant, but any crinum with stripes of pink on a white background, so there can be quite a variety.  These can be crosses between C.bulbispermum, the tough old Orange River crinum and C. zeylanicum, a more tender plant from the tropics. C. x baconi is composed of crosses between americanum and zeylanicumC. x gowenii are composed of crosses between bulbispermum and zeylanicum.  C. x herbertii are crosses between C. scabrum and bulbispermumC. digweedii are crosses between americanum and scabrum.  We are sometimes dismissive of the “ditch lilies” or C. bulbispermum found in abandoned gardens or in cemeteries in Texas, but they have given their toughness and cold hardiness to many crinum hybrids which we do enjoy.

Daffodils – Tazettas – Jonquils

In the South, almost anything yellow might be called a jonquil!  Narcissus are usually multi-flowered, and daffodils single flowered.  Most daffodils cannot be kept permanently here, but some of the narcissi are classics. N. jonquilla x odorus ‘Campernelle’ is the “Campernelle” of Southern yards and graveyards, N.  ‘Papyraceous’ is the ‘Paperwhite.’(1600s).  Very old tazetta hybrids include ‘Grand Monarque,’ (1600s) Soleil d’Or and the old cross ‘Italicus.’  These bulbs need very little help to survive.  Moving them out from under the shade of evergreen trees or dividing them every so many years will aid them in blooming more.  ‘Erlicheer’ and ‘Winston Churchill’ are also good choices for our area.  The Chinese Sacred Lily, N. tazetta orientalis has also been cultivated since the 1600s. The old hybrid ‘Intermedius’ such as Texas Star is yellow and starry looking with narrow foliage.

Paperwhites look perfectly at home in the old cemetery of Calvert’s Episcopal Church of the Epiphany. They are the only plantings here.

Only one of the Leucojums is really at home in Central Texas: L. aestivum, or Summer Snowflake.  It’s called SS even though it blooms in the spring.  None of the Snowdrops (Leucojum vernum) will really survive here.

luecojum

I love the small flowers of luecojum or “Summer Snowflake”

Philippine/Formosa lilies – an old-fashioned favorite with a mixed pedigree from both Philippine and Formosan strains.  It is extremely vigorous, and can flower the same year the seeds are sown.  Cut the stalks after flowering to keep small seedlings from filling your flower beds.  There is a dwarf variety called ‘Pricei’ but the five foot tall stalks with as many as a dozen flowers truly makes a cottage garden-like scene.  Other lilies that may become permanent in your garden are Easter lilies (L. longiflorum) and Tiger lilies (L. henryi).

Rain lilies we usually grow in Central Texas may be either Zephyranthes or Habranthus.  They are quite tough and drought tolerant once they are established.  Take care that rain lilies are not planted in an area where garden sprinklers keep them too wet, as they usually are stimulated to bloom within days of a good rain shower.

Z. grandiflora

  1. candida

Z. x La Buffarosa

H. robustus

Crosses such as Z. x Grandjax, Ajax, Sunset Strain, etc.

Grand-Primo-1

Grand Primo are one of the prettiest and most reliable narcissus for our area.

Scilla peruviana – not really from Peru, but from the Mediterranean, this bulb can bring welcome blue color into the garden.  After the leaves die down the bulb can be lifted and stored in the garage to keep it dry.  This seems to help flowering the next year.

Tigrida or Mexican shell flower, needs a warm, sunny and well drained place in the flower bed.  Some commercial varieties don’t last as well as others – experiment.  Each bloom lasts but one day, but they are a marvel of intricacy.

Iris: Not very many of the German bearded iris do well in our area, or towards the coast.  However, everyone has seen the white Cemetery iris, I. albicans.  It  was brought from North Africa by the Moors to Spain, and travelled to Texas with the earliest Spaniards.  It’s another plant that has established itself almost everywhere, but does not bear seeds.

Siberian iris need more cold than we can offer, but sometimes varieties such as ‘Caesar’s Brother’ can be grown. Louisiana iris, spurias, and some of the small species irises are nice companions in our flower beds.  Iris fulva, cerulea, prismatica, and virginica.

‘Walking Iris’ are more tropical in origin but can grow outside in sheltered places, or in containers that are brought in during the winter.  Trimezia has yellow flowers dotted with brown, and the Neomaricas have fugacious flowers in shades of white to blue, sometimes with darker brown dotted patterns.  Tufts of new offsets grow on the ends of their stems, and ultimately bend down to ground level, where they take root.

Agapanthus – our commercial varieties are hybrids between several species of African bulbs.  If possible, choose ‘evergreen’ rather than ‘deciduous’ varieties.  Agapanthus may be blue, blue-violet, light blue, or white.  Some are much shorter than others.  Be sure to give them full sun and protection from heavy frosts.  They’ll enjoy the alkaline conditions in our area.

Members of the Onion Family, or Alliums, are not very plentiful in our gardens.  The large, ornate and decorative ornamental onions with great balls of purple or white on the ends of 3-5’ stalks, cannot grow here well.  We must make do with the old fashioned Neapolitan onion, flowering garlic, Tulbagia violacea (Society Garlic), or flowering chives.

pink-rain-lily

Lovely pink rain lilies from Cynthia’s front yard

Crocus – Most of the Crocus family are not a good match for the College Station/Bryan area, because of problems with chilling requirements.  The Saffron Crocus, C. sativus, has a long history going back to Egyptian and Minoan times, and not just as a spice but as a medicinal herb too.  Grow these for fun in containers, so that you can keep them dry during the summer.  I have heard of one family living near Somerville, Texas who claims to grow these in the garden, and that they are multiplying.  The scarlet-orange stamens are the part that is picked and used as a flavoring.

Cannas sometimes suffer from the bad publicity of being called weedy, tall and eaten up by leaf rollers.  This doesn’t have to be the case.  There are many attractive shorter hybrids on the market now that can provide excellent summer color.  Just remember that, in a way similar to German iris, once a canna stalk has finished blooming it won’t bloom again, so cut it off at ground level.  Several caterpillars of the “skipper” type of butterfly feed on emerging canna stalks.  This helps in keeping things neat. They can be controlled by policing the plants, or by spraying a little insecticide into the rolled up coil of an emerging stalk.  Some varieties of canna seem to be unattractive to leaf rollers.

Day lily ‘Kwanso’ is an antique double form of Hemerocallis fulva that is still found in Texas gardens.  It does not set seed, but manages to multiply and be discovered in garden after garden.  There are many, many modern day lilies to choose from – let your personal taste decide – but if possible choose the ‘evergreen’ forms over ‘deciduous’ forms, which were bred for colder climates.

Byzantine gladiolus, with their spikes of fiery magenta flowers, are a sought after item in bulb catalogs.  The ones offered from Europe are really not the same bulb at all, and usually disappear after a year or so in the garden.  The Byzantine glad does not set seed for us, but multiplies at a fast rate, and is really a permanent garden resident.

byzantine-gladiolus

In my opinion, byzantine gladiolus are the most romantic of all the old garden bulbs

‘Tropical Giant’ is a large sterile hymenocallis with glossy, dark green leaves that no insects seem to want to eat.  It has spidery white flowers during the summer, and is an excellent permanent garden subject.  C. americanum and C. erubescens are two other good candidates for growing near water.

Anemones grow from small, claw-shaped roots and if care is given to their situation in the garden, they will survive for several years.

Achimenes, natives of the area between Mexico to Panama, can be kept out of doors permanently in larger containers, sometimes in the flower bed if it does not stay wet for long periods of time in the winter.  They can be purchased in almost any floral color.  They benefit from light shade and moist conditions.

Oxblood lily (Rhodophiala bifida) is a native of Argentina.  All those we see in old gardens and vacant lots descended from those imported in the late 1800’s by Peter Oberwetter, a German horticulturist from the Austin area.  And they did all this without the benefit of plentiful seeds!  They rarely set any, because they are all derived from one single clone.  Occasionally a pink form is found.

Calla lilies are usually hardy here for us.  They do not have to be planted near standing bodies of water, but will thrive in fairly moist soil.  The smaller florists’ varieties are better as houseplants, larger varieties outside, preferably where they will receive sun in the morning, shade in the afternoon.

Tulips need more winter chilling hours than we can offer, but there are several species tulips that might last: T. chrysantha and T. clusiana (lady tulip).

hymenocallis-1

Hymenocalis, or Spider Lily, has large upright foliage that can be used as a hedge. Plus it is resistant to just about all pests

For further reading:

Bulbs for Warm Climates, by Dr. Thad Howard.  UT Press, Austin, 2001.

Garden Bulbs for the South, by Scott Ogden.  Taylor Publishing Co., Dallas, 1994.

Perennial Garden Color, by Dr. William C. Welch, Taylor Publishing Co., Dallas, 1989.

I shared this post on the HomeAcre Hop.  Be sure to stop by and check out some of the best garden and homesteading tips and tricks from some of the best bloggers on the web!

Preparing My Plants for “Texas Winter”

geranium-texas-1

This is a very special geranium that I got from Greg Grant. These tubs are too big to take in during winter. If it weren’t for cuttings I would lose this plant in the first freeze.

Well, Texas winter is here.  It is going to freeze tonight for the first time of the season.  Now in my area it is not going to get that cold; 30 or so.  However, it is cold enough that several people have asked me what they should do to protect their plants.

As a general rule, temps in the 30s don’t really require you to do much.  Especially if you are talking about established trees, shrubs and other perennials.  In fact, if they are well mulched, you don’t really need to do anything.  If you want to give these established plants a little extra protection, simply water them well before the cold weather arrives.  Then, water them again the following morning if you can.  While it sounds contradictory, well hydrated soil actually insulates a plant’s roots much better than dry soil.

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Many tender perennials like geraniums, lavender, begonias and many succulents are very easy to propagate through cuttings

While our perennials should be fine, 30 is cold enough to get many of our more tender plants.  Because of this, I move most of my potted plants into my garage during our cold snaps.  My garage is detached and unheated.  However, it is always a few degrees warmer inside it than it is outside.

Before I move my plants into the garage I water them well and let them drain.  If you don’t let them drain you can wind up with a very wet garage floor if you over watered (like I always seem to do).  Watering, and the 3 or 4 extra degrees that the garage provides, is enough to keep most of our tender plants safe during our mild winters.

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Make your cut below a node and remove all but two or three leaves

We are lucky to live in a place that has such mild winters.  However, every once and a while, we will get temperatures low enough that watering and the garage are just not enough.  Last year we had an unusually cold winter.  We had an ice storm and three different times when temperature dipped into the 20s and stayed there.  I am sad to say that those cold temperatures killed a lot of very special begonias, geraniums, sedums and succulents.

Now this would have been a tragedy if I had not taken some extra precautions.  While all of my potted plants are special, I have one that is just a little more special than the others.  We have a bat wing begonia that belonged to my wife’s grandmother.  Her family has been able to keep this plant going for well over 50 years.  Can you imagine how much trouble I would be in if I let that begonia die?

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Place your cuttings in well moistened, high quality potting mix

Since I do not want to lose any of my potted pass alongs (especially the begonia), I always take cuttings of them at least a week before cold weather is scheduled to arrive.  Luckily, things like begonias, geraniums, sedums and succulents are very easy to keep alive (or multiply) through cuttings.

Before I take cuttings of my plants I fill my containers with a high quality potting mix ( I use solo cups with holes in the bottom of them that I burned with a soldering iron).  I then water the soil to settle it and to make sure it is fully hydrated for the cuttings.  Next, I make my cuttings.  I select a branch or stem that is six to eight inches long.  I cut it just below a node on a 45 degree angle.  Then I remove all flowers and all but two or three leaves.  This is probably the most important part of the process.  While plants need leaves to make their food, the do not need lots of leaves to make roots.  In fact, some plants (like roses) can produce roots with nothing more than a green stem.

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By taking cuttings each winter I ensure that I have lots of plants in the spring

Once the cutting is properly prepared I stick my finger almost to the bottom of the pot.  I then drop in the cutting and firm up the soil.  I give it one more light watering and then move it to a large galvanized tray.  I repeat this process until the tray is full.  Then I move the cuttings to my “grow rack” in my mudroom that I use for overwintering plants and starting seedlings.

While we are lucky to live in a pretty mild climate, it is severe enough to kill many of the more tender perennials that we love.  If you are lucky enough to have room in your garage for all of your pots you will be fine throughout most of our “freezes”.  However, if you don’t have room in the garage you can ensure that you will have these plants next spring if you take cuttings.  This extra step is very easy and takes up much less room than trying to store a bunch of pots.  Plus it can guarantee that no matter what happens with the weather, you will still have your wife’s  prized begonia in the spring!

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All succulents are very easy to propagate through cuttings

Growing Sweet Potatoes (Ipomoae batatas)

My wife and I love sweet potatoes.  In fact, we love them so much that we eat everything we grow and still need to buy a fifty pound box of “Beauregard” potatoes from a friend that goes to Louisiana every November.

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Sweet potatoes are delicious, versatile and nutritious. Photo by Bruce Leander

Now I have to admit, I have not always loved sweet potatoes this much.  When I was a kid my family only ate sweet potatoes at “the holidays”.  Our Thanksgiving and Christmas “sweet potatoes “ came in the form of a mushy, orange bowl of goo dripping in syrup and covered in baked marshmallows.  Now you would think that with that much sweetness going for it, I would look forward to the holidays.  Well, I didn’t.  I hated this mushy mess (and so did everyone under 40 that I knew at the time) and it made me dread Holiday dinners.  Even though I loved the turkey and dressing, ambrosia and pea salad, I knew it would all be ruined by that sticky, slimy mess that my mother would force me to eat.

I am not sure how or when it happened, but sometime in the past few years my opinion of sweet potatoes changed.  Sweet potatoes have now become a staple in my (and many other Americans) diet.  As interest in healthy eating has surged the popularity of the sweet potato has sky rocketed.  And why not?  Sweet potatoes are loaded with vitamin B6, vitamin C and vitamin D.  They are also full of iron, magnesium, potassium and carotenoids like beta carotene.  Plus, they are full of natural sugars (that make them taste so great when cooked properly) that are actually good for you.

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Patty Leander plants here home grown sweet potato slips in her Austin garden. Photo by Bruce Leander

Making Slips

In my experience, the hardest part about growing sweet potatoes is finding them.  Sweet potatoes are generally grown from “slips” (however they DO NOT HAVE TO BE, read my post on growing sweet potatoes from the actual potato).  Slips are simply sprouts that grow out of a mature sweet potato.  If you have access to a local producer/seller of slips you will have no problem.  In my experience, it is getting harder and harder to find people who are willing to grow, harvest and sell their slips locally.  If this is the position you find yourself in you have two choices – go to the internet and hope for the best or grow your own.

Slips are easy to grow, so I grow my own.  Since we buy 50 lbs of Beauregards each year I always keep a few of those back for seed potatoes.  You can do this with any variety you like.  If you find a variety you like at the store keep a few back.  If using store bought potatoes look at the skins closely.  Some are sprayed with wax to extend their shelf life.  If they have wax on them they will not sprout well for you.  Look for unwaxed varieties if you want to use them for seed.

 

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Sweet potatoes can be planted from March through July in in Central Texas. Photo by Bruce Leander.

Before we talk about how to grow your own, we need to discuss when to start growing them.  Before you grow your slips you have to determine when you are going to plant them.  In my Zone 9 garden I can plant sweet potatoes anytime between March 15 and July 4.  Determine when you want to plant and then start your slips about six weeks before you want to move them to the garden. I like to plant my sweet potatoes a little later than most folks.  I usually plant around June 1.  To meet that planting date I need to start my slip production around the first of April.

I have had good luck making slips by placing tooth picks in the side of the tuber and submerging the bottom half of it in water.  For best results place your tubers in a sunny location where they will be between 75 and 85 degrees.  In a few days, the eyes will begin to produce the shoots that you will use as your slips.  These shoots will grow straight up from tuber.  When they are about 6” long snap them off with a twisting motion where they touch the sweet potato.  If you look closely you will see little roots already beginning to form where the slip grows out from the tuber.  Try and get those little roots when snap the slip off.  Once you have harvested the slips move them to another container of water.  In about a week, the slips in the jar will create a pretty extensive root system.  Once the slips put on roots they are ready for planting.  You can either move them directly to the garden at this point or you can pot them up and let them become established for later planting.

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Sweet potatoes can easily produce three or four pounds of tubers per row foot. Photo by Bruce Leander.

While I have had success with the tuber in water method, I have had two problems with it.  The first is rotting tubers.  If you leave your potato in water too long it will become mushy and begin to stink to high heaven.  The second issue has to do with the slips.  If you leave them in water for too long the will grow an EXTENSIVE root system.  When I have planted these overgrown slips I have not had good luck getting them to grow when I put them in the soil.  Because of this, I recommend planting, or potting your slips soon after the roots begin to form.

Planting and Growing

Since sweet potatoes grow below ground, it is best to plant them in a loose soil.  Sandy loam is perfect.  Loose soil will allow them to get big and form attractively shaped tubers.  However, the main reason you want to grow in loose soil will become very evident when you try and harvest them.  It can be very hard to get the undamaged roots out of heavy soils like the black clay I grow in.  If you don’t have sand or loam you can still grow sweet potatoes.  Make beds that are about a foot tall and very well worked with compost.

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Sweet potatoes produce lovely and lush edible vines. Photo by Bruce Leander.

Plant your sweet potatoes in full sun.  Sweet potatoes are tropical vining plants.  Because of this they love high heat and full sun.  My beds run east to west so my plants can get the most sunlight possible.

I grow my sweet potatoes in a single bed that is 33‘ long and about 10’ wide.  To plant my slips I drive a large screw driver into the center of the bed and swirl it around to make a hole about every 12″.  I then drop the slip in and firm up the soil around it.  Once the slips are planted I water every other day for a couple of weeks to ensure that those young tender roots get fully established before the heat of our summers really kicks in.

Once the sweet potatoes are in all you have to do is water and wait.  These tropical vines will thrive on a twice a week watering schedule.  Once the vines start spreading do not add any supplement nitrogen.  Too much nitrogen will encourage the plant to make big beautiful foliage and small fibrous roots.

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To grow the biggest sweet potatoes possible grow them in a loose soil. Photo by Bruce Leander.

Harvest and storage

Sweet potatoes take 100 to 140 days to mature fully.  However, you can harvest them at any stage of their development.  Once they reach that 100 day point start watching their foliage.  When they are ready the leaves will begin to turn yellow and the vines will begin to look less full and healthy.

If you plan on storing your sweet potatoes you must dig them carefully.  Knicks or breaks in the skin will encourage rot during storage.  When you get ready to harvest take a garden spade and work it into the soil just beyond the end of the vine.  Gently turn the soil over to expose your tubers.  Pick these up and then continue moving toward the center of the row.  Sweet potatoes can produce tubers anywhere along their vines.  Because of this you will want to turn over all of the soil in the bed.

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Sweet potato skins are tender. use a spade to carefully remove them from the soil. Photo by Bruce Leander.

When harvesting your potatoes do not wash them immediately.  Separate the unblemished potatoes from those that have knicks or cuts.  Go ahead and wash the damaged potatoes and take them inside.  You will want to eat these first.  Next, take the unblemished potatoes and lay them out in the sun for several hours to allow them to cure.  When the roots come out of the ground their skins are very tender.  Laying them in the sun will allow the skins to “set” or harden off before they go into storage.  It will also dry out the soil that is still clinging to the tubers.  Gently brush this soil off before moving them into storage.

Once you have cleaned your sweet potatoes spread them out in baskets that are lined with newspaper.  Place them in a dry area that is around 85 degrees for a couple more weeks.  At the end of this time the sweet potatoes are cured and can be stored for several months.  Store your potatoes in a cool location that has high humidity.  Proper storage will allow you to store your potatoes for several months.

Jalapeño Sweet Potato Soup

Sally and I eat sweet potatoes year round.  Generally we cut them into fries and toss with peppers, onions, olive oil and spices and then bake them at 450 degrees for 30 or 40 minutes.  However, each fall, we use them to make a soup that is ABSOLUTELY AMAZING!  We got this recipe from our friends at Homestead Heritage in Waco several years ago.  I highly recommend you make this soup.  It is truly the best soup I have ever eaten!

4 lbs Sweet Potatoes

1 medium onion

3 slice smoked turkey bacon or ham

3 cloves garlic

2TBSP Butter

8 cups Chicken Broth

1 tsp cumin

¼ cup pickled, sliced jalapeños

½ cup cilantro (leaves only)

1 ½ cups half and half

1 tsp salt

1 tsp black pepper

Optional sweetener to taste

*Scrub sweet potatoes, cut in quarters, place in large stock pan, cover with water and boil until soft

*When potatoes are soft drain them and let them cool until you can handle them.  Peel of skins

*Peel and chop onion.  Finely chop bacon or ham and garlic

*In large soup pot, melt butter.  Add meat, onion and garlic and sautee until onions are translucent

*Add chicken broth.  Cover and bring to a boil.

*Dice half of the sweet potatoes and stir into the boiling broth

*Puree the remaining sweet potatoes with the jalapenos, cumin, cilantro and half and half.  Stir into soup.  Add salt and pepper.  Stir well, heat through.

* Taste.  Add sweetener if desired